Babies Just Want to Be Smile At- Janusha Cooray

Did you know that babies smile strategically? I didn’t until I listened to a podcast from Scientific American. From a podcast by Erika Beras, I learned that babies smile to get the other person to smile back. Researchers call it sophisticated timing. The study is in the journal PLOS ONE which is a peer-reviewed open access scientific journal. Mothers and their babies were chosen by the researcher to carry out the study. When studying the interactions, the researchers made four categories.

  1. Babies wanted to maximize the amount of time smiling at their mothers.
  2. They wanted to maximize the time the mothers smiled at them.
  3. They wanted to experience simultaneous smiling.
  4. No smiling at all.

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By studying the timing and effect of the smile, the investigators found out that the goal for mothers was to be smiling simultaneously 70 percent of the time. For babies, the goal was for their mothers to be smiling at them, 80 percent of the time. Babies may not be very independent but they know exactly how to make you smile.

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Here is the script for the podcast:

Ever try to get a baby to smile? It can seem close to impossible—and then suddenly there it is: that elusive, seemingly joyous grin. Well it turns out those smiles aren’t spontaneous—they’re strategic.

Researchers have found that when babies smile, it’s for a reason. They want whoever they’re interacting with—typically a parent—to smile back. And they time it just so, a smile here and a smile there. The researchers call it sophisticated timing. The study is in the journal PLoS ONE. [Paul Ruvolo, Daniel Messinger, Javier Movellan, Infants Time Their Smiles to Make Their Moms Smile]

The researchers enlisted real mothers and infants and quantified their interactions, which fell into four categories. One: babies wanted to maximize the amount of time smiling at their mothers. Two: they wanted to maximize the time the mothers smiled at them. Three: they wanted to experience simultaneous smiling, and four: no smiling at all.

By studying when smiles happened and what the subsequent effect was, the investigators were able to figure out that for mothers the goal 70 percent of the time was to be smiling simultaneously—while for babies 80 percent of the time they just wanted their mother smiling at them. So, mothers want the interaction, while babies just want to be smiled at.

So your baby may not be able to feed itself, talk or even turn over yet. But when it comes to smiles, babies seem to know exactly what they’re up to.

—Erika Beras

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